Bangladeshi origin Hamza scores maiden EPL goal

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Hamza Choudhury, the 22-year old of Bangladesh-Grenada heritage, came on as a substitute in the 77th minute in place of James Maddison, and scored in the 87th minute that saw his side keep the second spot of the league table after gameweek 21, thanks to a thumping 3-0 away victory

Hamza Dewan Choudhury, the son of a Bengali woman, scored his first ever English Premier League goal when he netted the third and final goal of Leicester City against Newcastle United at St James’ Park Wednesday.

Hamza, the 22-year old of Bangladesh-Grenada heritage, came on as a substitute in the 77th minute in place of James Maddison, and scored in the 87th minute that saw his side keep the second spot of the league table after gameweek 21, thanks to a thumping 3-0 away victory. 

The midfielder, who is regarded as one of the most promising talents in world football, has already featured in seven games for England U-21 and is under the radar of many big clubs around the globe for his robust and solid style of play.

When he was five, Hamza’s mother Rafia decided to take her “energetic” son to football coaching to let off steam – and it has proved to be an inspired decision.

Childhood

Hamza describes his childhood household as “loud”. 

His cousins would come over to play in the park and on video games, while on the table there were always some of his favorite dishes: curry, rice, samosas and hot sweet tea.

For part of the school holidays the Choudhurys would visit his mother’s family in Bangladesh. 

The trips would leave a lasting impression on the midfielder, who is fluent in Bengali. 

The sight of this young boy with an afro, however, would cause a minor ripple in his family’s Sylhet village.

Hamza Choudhury’s goal against Newcastle was the first of his senior career.

Absolutely well worth the wait. 🚀 pic.twitter.com/3sFrN2GUDt

“A few of my childhood memories are of Bangladesh. Being there, just being able to do what you want,” he says.

“You see kids walking around at 10 o’clock at night, not a care in the world…freedom and completely safe.

“People were definitely surprised that I could speak Bengali. I had a little afro when I was a kid, so all the kids used to find me quite interesting and run around after me. We used to go there every other year while we were growing up for two to three weeks – it was nice. Very special.

“It’s my heritage and my culture, so it’s nice. It’s really nice going back. I think it also humbles you as a kid and it shows you different parts of the world because when you grow up in England you can live in a bit of a bubble.

“To go there opens your eyes to see what kinds of struggles people actually go through, so it is humbling.”